Graphene extension

// todo Needs to be rewritten

GraphQL based on django ModelForms

Here is a simple Django model in my_app/models.py:

from django.db import models

class User(models.Model):
    first_name = models.CharField(max_length=100)
    last_name = models.CharField(max_length=100)

Now we create a ModelForm in my_app/forms.py:

  from django import forms
  from .models import User

  class UserForm(forms.ModelForm):
      class Meta:
          model = User
          fields = ('first_name', 'last_name')

We need to create an ``ObjectType`` which we derive from our model.
Lives in ``my_apps/schemes/schematypes.py``\ :
  from graphene_django import DjangoObjectType
  from ..models import User

  class UserType(DjangoObjectType):
      class Meta:
          model = User

Here's the mutation in ``my_app/schema/mutations.py``.
It takes a ``ModelForm`` (or a non-model form) to derive the validation rules from:
  import graphene
  from graphene_django_ai.forms.mutations import LoginRequiredDjangoModelFormMutation
  from .schematypes import UserType
  from ..forms import UserForm


  class UserCreateUpdateMutation(LoginRequiredDjangoModelFormMutation):
      space = graphene.Field(UserType)

      class Meta:
          form_class = UserForm


  # Register new mutation
  class UserMutation(graphene.ObjectType):
      spaces = UserCreateUpdateMutation.Field(description='Create and update users')

If you register now your ``UserMutation`` in your schema you have a working model-based and DRY API
endpoint. Congratulations!

DeleteMutation for django-model objects

If you want to delete an object you can easily use the DeleteMutation like this:

from graphene_django_ai.schemes.mutations import DeleteMutation
from my_app.models import MyModel

class MyModelDeleteMutation(DeleteMutation):
    class Meta:
        model = MyModel

If you are using django-graphql-jwt authentication you can ensure only logged in access to your delete endpoint like this:

from graphene_django_ai.schemes.mutations import LoginRequiredDeleteMutation
from my_app.models import MyModel

class MyModelDeleteMutation(LoginRequiredDeleteMutation):
    class Meta:
        model = MyModel

If you need to customize the validation or the base queryset you can override methods like this:

from graphene_django_ai.schemes.mutations import LoginRequiredDeleteMutation
from graphql import GraphQLError
from my_app.models import MyModel

class MyModelDeleteMutation(LoginRequiredDeleteMutation):
    class Meta:
        model = MyModel

    def validate(self, request):
        if not request.user.is_superuser:
            raise GraphQLError("This is only allowed for superusers!")

    def get_queryset(self, request):
        return self.model.objects.filter(created_by=request.user)

JWT secure mutations

If you derive your mutation from LoginRequiredDjangoModelFormMutation you don’t have to manually take care about securing the login with the decorators.

from graphene_django_ai.forms.mutations import LoginRequiredDjangoModelFormMutation
class MyMutation(LoginRequiredDjangoModelFormMutation):
    ...

Testing GraphQL calls

If you want to unittest your API calls derive your test case from the class GraphQLTestCase.

Usage:

import json

from graphene_django.tests.base_test import GraphQLTestCase
from my_project.config.schema import schema

class MyFancyTestCase(GraphQLTestCase):

    # Here you need to inject your test case's schema
    GRAPHQL_SCHEMA = schema

    def test_some_query(self):
        response = self.query(
            '''
            query {
                myModel {
                    id
                    name
                }
            }
            ''',
            op_name='myModel'
        )
        content = json.loads(response.content)
        # This validates the status code and if you get errors
        self.assertResponseNoErrors(response)

        # Add some more asserts if you like
        ...

    def test_some_mutation(self):
        response = self.query(
            '''
            mutation myMutation($input: MyMutationInput!) {
                myMutation(input: $input) {
                    my-model {
                        id
                        name
                    }
                }
            }
            ''',
            op_name='myMutation',
            input_data={'my_field': 'foo', 'other_field': 'bar'}
        )
        # This validates the status code and if you get errors
        self.assertResponseNoErrors(response)

        # Add some more asserts if you like
        ...

    def test_failing_call(self):

       response = self.query(
           '''
           mutation myMutation($input: MyMutationInput!) {
               myMutation(input: $badInput) {
                   my-model {
                       id
                       name
                   }
               }
           }
           ''',
           op_name='myMutation',
           input_data={'my_field': 'foo', 'other_field': 'bar'}
       )
       # This assert tests if the call raised some errors
       # For example if you want to test if invalid input is handled correctly by your endpoint
       self.assertResponseHasErrors(response)

       # Add some more asserts if you like
       ...